Nyberg NASA nasa astronaut karen nyberg nasa NASA Nyberg

Nyberg NASA nasa astronaut karen nyberg nasa NASA Nyberg

We found 21++ Images in Nyberg NASA:




About this page - Nyberg NASA

Nyberg NASA Astronaut Karen Nyberg Inspires The Next Generation Of NASA Nyberg, Nyberg NASA Fancy A Space To Earth Quilting Bee Heres Your Chance To Nyberg NASA, Nyberg NASA Photo Jsc2013e002678 Nyberg NASA, Nyberg NASA Nasa Astronaut Karen Nyberg Nasa NASA Nyberg, Nyberg NASA Womennasa Karen Nyberg NASA Nyberg, Nyberg NASA Astronaut Packs For Tuesday Trip To International Space NASA Nyberg, Nyberg NASA Weekly Iss Experiments Report Spinal Studies More NASA Nyberg, Nyberg NASA Astronaut Attends High School Reunion From Space Mnn Nyberg NASA, Nyberg NASA Nasa Nasa Astronaut Karen Nyberg Nyberg NASA, Nyberg NASA Nasa Astronaut Karen Nyberg Nasa NASA Nyberg.

A little interesting about space life.

Dr. Porco believes that the icy moon, with its underground liquid sea of water, organics, as well as an energy source, may potentially host life similar to that found in analogous environments on Earth. The March 2012 images of Cassini's "tiger stripes" revealed that these cracks widen and narrow, as was suspected from pictures taken previously. The fissures also change over time more frequently than was originally thought. The two opposite sides of the fissures move laterally relative to one another. This is analogous to the way two banks of the San Andreas Fault can move forward and back, as well as in opposite directions. The greatest slipping and sliding happens when Enceladus is closest to Saturn--as scientists expected.



and here is another

Launched as GRAIL A and GRAIL B in September 2011, the probes were renamed Ebb and Flow by schoolchildren in Montana. The probes operated in almost circular orbit near the lunar poles at an altitude of approximately 34 miles, until their mission came to an end in December 2012. The distance between the twin probes altered a bit as they soared over areas of lesser and greater gravity that were caused by visible topological features on the Moon's surface, such as impact craters and mountains--as well as by masses that were secreted beneath the lunar surface.



and finally

The GRAIL mission determined the internal structure of the Moon in great detail for nine months during 2012. Armed with this the new information, GRAIL astronomers were able to redefine the sizes of the largest impact basins on the lunar surface.

More information:

Life as we know it depends on the presence of three ingredients: liquid water; a source of energy for metabolism; and the right chemical ingredients, mainly carbon, hydrogen, nitrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and sulfur. With this new discovery of the existence of hydrogen, in the tattle-tale plume shooting out from the surface of Enceladus, Cassini has revealed to the prying eyes of curious astronomers, that this small, icy moon has almost all of these ingredients important for habitability. At this point, Cassini has not detected the presence of phosphorus and sulfur in the hidden subsurface ocean of this distant small world, but many planetary scientists suspect that they will eventually be detected because the rocky core of Enceladus is believed to be similar to certain meteorities that contain these two critical elements.



GRAIL Mission Puts A New Face On The Moon! Scientific investigation into the origin of lunar impact basins has been hampered because there is a general lack of agreement on their size. The majority of the largest impact basins pock-mark the near-side of the Moon (the Moon's enchanting "face"), and have also been filled in by gushing lava streams. These lava streams have covered up, and rendered invisible, important clues pertaining to the shape of the land.



However, the models become somewhat more complicated when different forms of ice are taken into consideration. The ice floating around in a glass of water is termed Ice I. Ice I is the least dense form of ice, and it is lighter than water. However, at high pressures, like those that exist in crushingly deep subsurface oceans like Ganymede's, the ice crystal structures evolve into something considerably more compact. "It's like finding a better arrangement of shoes in your luggage--the ice molecules become packed together more tightly," Dr. Vance said in his May 1, 2014 statement. Indeed, the ice can become so extremely dense that it is actually heavier than water--and therefore somersaults down to the bottom of the sea. The heaviest, densiest ice of all is believed to exist within Ganymede, and it is called Ice VI.