Orbital Inclination of Solar System

In 1966, Peter Goldreich published a classic paper on the evolution of the moon’s orbit and on the orbits of other moons in the solar system. He showed that, for each planet, there is a distance such that moons closer to the planet than that distance maintain an almost constant orbital inclination with respect to the planet’s equator (with an orbital precession mostly due to the tidal influence of the planet), whereas moons farther away maintain an almost constant orbital inclination with respect to the ecliptic (with precession due mostly to the tidal influence of the sun). The moons in the first category, with the exception of Neptune’s moon Triton, orbit near the equatorial plane. He concluded that these moons formed from equatorial accretion disks. But he found that our moon, although it was once inside the critical distance from the earth, never had an equatorial orbit as would be expected from various scenarios for its origin. This is called the lunar inclination problem, to which various solutions have since been proposed.

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